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Haiti: Carnival and Rara: Crossed Perspectives on Culture and Haitian IdentityHaïti : Carnaval et Rara
Haiti: Carnival and Rara: Crossed Perspectives on Culture and Haitian Identity
Haïti : Carnaval et Rara
  • February 17, 2024
  • | 0

Haiti: Carnival and Rara: Crossed Perspectives on Culture and Haitian Identity

In our tradition, carnival represents an essential cultural activity. Indeed, for the holding of it this year, the State had drawn from the public treasury not only a huge sum but also a strong concentration of law enforcement to ensure the protection and security of carnival-goers in the area. metropolitan. Despite numerous criticisms and concerns expressed by certain media on the one hand, then on the other hand by the democratic opposition. While it is true that in Port au Prince these concerns had had a no less valuable consequence on the progress of this festivity. It is no less true that this was the case in other provincial towns, as proof in the southeast department the authorities did not record anything as an element of accident or incident during the progress of the carnival unlike Port au Prince.

Certainly, socio/economic problems are increasingly worrying, nevertheless what makes us what we are today, a free and independent people is none other than our exceptionality. This deeply expresses our intrinsic characteristic in relation to people. In fact, historically we are a people who laugh and cry, smile and irritate, dance and hit the system, sing and fight so well that "grenadya alaso sa ki mouri zafè ya yo" is the most emblematic song of the slaves for the conquest of our freedom. We do not intend to claim that those who expressed their disagreement with the carnival are showing a historical deficit. However, we leave in the shadows a fundamental question: why is carnival taken care of by the State while the rara is like an abandoned child?


The rara is not only a simple cultural tradition but, above all, it is the heritage of our valiant warriors who bravely fought the French expeditionary army, the most powerful of the time. While, this mass cultural, she is still marginalized by state authorities. It is emphasized that social cohesion is the dead point of carnival. On the other hand, this is the strong point of rara. As proof, the Thursday of the Dead in our Voudouesque tradition which represents the opening ceremony for the rara bands is the blatant testimony of this social cohesion.

And, in fact, there were circles of people who took divergent directions to attend the opening ceremony of their rara bands.

For this opening ceremony the atmosphere was a taste of carnival in terms of color. On the side of Croix Hilaire, for the title champion Ratyèfè full force band, the color of his club was very diverse, a long dress of apricot yellow, mauve white, then white scarf. In terms of performance, this band had completely proven its champion skills thanks to its arsenal of musicians who were not in their testing phase. To tell the truth, they performed their note with surgical precision as a doctor-surgeon in his surgical procedure. The synchronization between the musicians, the instruments and then the fans form a whole and harmonize perfectly well. This band not only has the magic of words and verbs, it seems that they also have the magic to thrill even the most reluctant fans. Moreover, his performance for this dead Thursday was a challenge for his rivals this weekend to the extent that their performances were less good.

On the symbol side of light, Grap Kenèp was the wonder of the Thursday evening of the dead. His club dressed in the appropriate color for this evening, purple scarf, purple jersey, then white “kolan”. In a symbolic way, this marriage of color represents Baron in Haitian Vodou. Without a doubt, it was the most beautiful symbolic representation of the evening. In terms of performance, returning from the cemetery we felt a very strong warmth of jubilation, elation, and playfulness for a completely balanced performance. As far as Chenn Tamarin is concerned, it was already 2 a.m. when our team met him, it was a less good performance than what we were accustomed to. On the symbolic side it leaves something to be desired. His news was that he had his own media.

Petit-Goave/Culture and Society

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Gladimyr Vaval

    Journaliste
    Email : ladvaval86@gmail.com

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